Proper Contact Lens Care Keeps Your Lenses Comfortable and Clean

Proper Contact Lens Care Keeps Your Lenses Comfortable and Clean

Have you ever worn your contact lenses longer than recommended or rinsed them with water? Those and other shortcuts can compromise your vision and increase your risk of dangerous eye infections. Following your optometrist's care instructions will help you avoid common contact lens wear pitfalls.

Safe Handling and Cleaning Techniques Help You Protect Your Eyes

Preventing bacterial or fungal infections can be as simple as following these recommendations:

Follow Your Eye Doctor's Care Recommendations

Heeding your optometrist's instructions for contact lens care is the simplest way to avoid discomfort and infections. If you use daily disposable contact lenses, you'll throw away your contact lenses at the end of the day and won't have to worry about cleaning solutions.

Other types of lenses require regular cleaning. Squirt a little disinfecting solution on each lens, then gently rub each side for several seconds to remove proteins, lipids and microorganisms. Consult the instructions printed on the solution to determine how long you should rub the lenses. After you rub them, rinse the lenses with the solution, place them in their case and fill the case with fresh solution.

Your eye doctor will let you know how often you should clean or replace your lenses, depending on their type. In some cases, your optometrist may alter the wear schedule. For example, although extended wear lenses can be worn overnight, he or she may suggest that you only wear them during the day.

Learn the Signs That May Indicate That You Have an Eye Infection

The sooner an eye infection is treated, the less likely it will temporarily or permanently damage your visit. Be alert for these signs of a possible infection:

Regular visits to the optometrist are a must if you wear contact lenses. If it's time for your next appointment, or you're having a little trouble with your lenses, call us to schedule an appointment.

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