How does our site make you feel?
Great   Indifferent

Eye Perception

Visual perception refers to a set of skills used to collect and interpret visual information taken in from our environment. The visual information gathered is combined with our other senses, allowing us to derive meaning from what we see. Through the process of merging visual data with our other senses, we are also able to organize eye and physical movement. For this, visual perception is critical when it comes to our ability to learn, move with ease and understand the world around us.

How Your Eyes See

Seeing begins with the lens of the eye focusing an image onto the retina, a light-sensitive membrane located in the rear of the eye. The retina contains cells called photoreceptors, and they translate light into electrochemical signals that journey along the optic nerve fibers to the brain. When the signals reach the brain, they are read as vision in the visual cortex and the brain puts meaning to what is being seen.

Just as the eyes send signals to the brain, the brain also sends signals to the eyes, ultimately controlling their movement. And as we are aware, the brain additionally releases signals to other organs, muscles and nerves throughout the body, controlling their movement as well.

When our vision is not in sync with our brain and other senses, there is a dysfunction, and this can lead to:

 

Correcting Your Vision With Therapy

Through the aid of visual therapy, this dysfunction can be corrected with a mix of vision exercises and specialized equipment that train the visual system to work in coordination with the brain and other senses.

Devices used to help achieve this may include:

Therapy is guided by an optometrist and is performed in an office once to twice a week for up to an hour. The types of exercises and equipment, as well as the number of sessions required, will depend on the individual needs of the patient. To supplement office visits, the optometrist will likely give the patient instruction on how to perform certain vision exercises at home.

Following the completion of vision therapy—meaning all necessary sessions have ended—the individual should be able to coordinate eye and physical movements, their visual capabilities should have improved and there should be greater efficiency when it comes to processing and interpreting visual information.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Pinguecula and Pterygium (Surfer's Eye)

Characterized by a yellowish raised part of the scleral conjunctiva (the lining of the white part of the eye), a pinguecula usually develops near the cornea (colored part of the eye), but does not extend past it.

Uveitis

Uveitis refers to the inflammation of the eye's middle layer, which consists of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid. Several fungal, viral, or bacterial infections lead to uveitis, as do certain autoimmune (systemic) and inflammatory conditions...

Glare and Halos

Glare and halos are both eye symptoms that some people experience around bright lights. Halos show up as bright circles around a light source. Glare is light that interferes with your vision, making it difficult to see or sometimes making your eyes water.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States, making it an important public health priority. Although there are several factors that cause glaucoma, all types of glaucoma are characterized by damage to the optic nerve...

Sjogren's Syndrome

Pronounced SHOW-grins, Sjogren's syndrome is a disorder of the immune system, or an autoimmune disease, which causes the body's immune system to attack and harm the body's glands...

Optic Neuritis

Also known as demyelinating optic neuritis, optic neuritis refers to the inflammation of the optic nerve due to the loss of or damage to a protective covering called myelin, which surrounds the optic nerve...